HomeAbout

SIGN IN   Advanced Search










 
Browse Illustration
Systems Biology--Biomedical Modeling

Because of the complexity inherent in biological systems, many researchers frequently rely on a combination of global analysis and computational approaches to gain insight into both (i) how interacting components can produce complex system behaviors, and (ii) how changes in conditions may alter these behaviors. Because the biological details of a particular system are generally not taught along with the quantitative approaches that enable hypothesis generation and analysis of the system, we developed a course at Mount Sinai School of Medicine that introduces first-year graduate students to these computational principles and approaches. We anticipate that such approaches will apply throughout the biomedical sciences and that courses such as the one described here will become a core requirement of many graduate programs in the biological and biomedical sciences.

Rate this Resource:
1 = not useful, 5 = very useful

User Rating: 4 / 5 stars - 1 vote(s).


View Free
Resource

Classifications


Resource Type: Bibliography, Course syllabus, Diagram, Illustration, Lesson plan, Table
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Eric A. Sobie of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, Young-Seon Lee of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, Sherry L. Jenkins of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, Ravi Iyengar of Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

Comments


» Sign In or register to post comments.


Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling


     
   

SITE MAP | CONTACT | POLICIES

Triple A S National Science Foundation Naitonal Science Digital Library Pathway
Funded by the individual BEN Collaborators and grants from the
National Science Foundation [DUE 0085840 / DUE 0226185 / DUE 0532797 / DUE 0734995]

This website is a National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Pathway.
Copyright © 2019. American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.