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Bacterial Scaffolds Assemble Novel Higher-Order Complexes to Reengineer Eukaryotic Cell Processes

Many microbial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to inject proteins referred to as effectors directly into eukaryotic host cells. These effectors directly target various eukaryotic signaling pathways and cellular processes, often by mimicking the activity of host cell proteins. Effectors of pathogenic Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium can also act as molecular scaffolds that not only recruit but also directly regulate the activity and localization of multiple eukaryotic proteins. By assembling and localizing disparate signaling pathways, the bacteria can reengineer host cell processes to generate novel processes not previously observed in eukaryotic cells.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Cammie F. Lesser of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, John M. Leong of Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems, University of Massachusetts Medical School
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes

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STKE/Science Signaling


     
   

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