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Nearly Buried, Mussels Get a Helping Hand

Freshwater mussels are the most endangered group of organisms in the United States, with most of their river and stream habitats devastated by dams, pollution, and invasive species such as the zebra mussel. Thirty-five species have been declared extinct, others are likely gone, and more than 70 species are on the brink. Mussel conservationists have persuaded a few dam operators to modify their water releases to improve conditions for mussels and have helped restore water quality in important mussel habitats. Researchers, meanwhile, are trying to solve some puzzles in mussel ecology, figure out how to culture more kinds of endangered mussels in captivity, and ramp up restoration efforts.

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Resource Type: Video, Journal, Animation, Illustration
Audience Level: High school upper division 11-12, Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Professional (degree program), General public & informal education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Erik Stokstad of Science
Publisher: SCIENCE
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

Comments

Posted by: Matt on 07-15-2013
A narrated slideshow lacking necessary context. It boils down to "mussels neato, scientists wear wetsuits, coal mining is bad, oh look, a tobacco barn." The big back story of land use conversion and water resources management must be supplied.

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