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Central and Peripheral Signaling Mechanisms Involved in Endocannabinoid Regulation of Feeding: A Perspective on the Munchies

The endocannabinoid system is a critical regulator of energy homeostasis and food intake. Through cannabinoid (CB)1 receptors in the brain and periphery, endocannabinoids exert powerful effects on the systems of the body that coordinate the balance between food intake, metabolism, and energy expenditure. These integrative systems control food intake both by modulating the inputs to various brain areas that monitor energy balance and by increasing the hedonic or reward value of the food consumed. Cannabinoids also alter metabolism, acting through both centrally located CB1 receptors that drive neuronal pathways controlling metabolism and peripheral CB1 receptors located in tissues throughout the body.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Diagram, Illustration, Image, Journal article/Issue, Review
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Keith A. Sharkey of Hotchkiss Brain Institute and Institute of Infection Inflammation and Immunity, University of Calgary, Quentin J. Pittman of Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Calgary
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling


     
   

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