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EB 2012 Refresher Course - Endocrinology

Diabetes mellitus is a rapidly escalating health crisis that is estimated to affect 285 million individuals worldwide. Although there is general agreement that diabetes should be part of the medical curriculum, there is less of a consensus on how it should be taught. Nevertheless, knowledge of the perturbations that occur in diabetes is essential to the understanding of this disease and therapeutic drug actions. The intent of this refresher course is to bring together a cadre of presenters with extensive knowledge and experience in teaching this material. Not only will this benefit faculty members assigned to teach endocrinology, but it will be useful for any investigator with a general interest in understanding the pathophysiology of diabetes. The course will include discussions of perturbations in brain-gut interactions, adipocyte-islet interactions and islet-brain interactions, as well as the mechanisms of current drug therapies that are less well covered in traditional textbooks.

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Resource Type: Digital Presentation (Powerpoint), Video, Meeting Presentation
Audience Level: Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Shanthi Srinivasan of Emory University, Suraj Unniappan of York University, Peter M Thule of Emory University/Atlanta VA Medical Center
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society


     
   

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