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The Plague of the 21st Century: HIV and the Human Immune System-2014 APS Video Contest

Video on stereotypical disease that only "homosexuals" and "drug-users" are infected by. However, that is simply a myth, according to the CDC and Aids.org individuals over the age sixty and teenagers between the ages of 13-19 are the most commonly affected age groups infected by the Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Our video was created as a comical but serious message to the general public about HIV. In the video we explain the difference between bacterial vs. viral infections. Furthermore, we explain the virology of the disease. We provide the distinction on how HIV is a unique virus and explain how the newly synthesized viral DNA becomes inserted into the host genome. We discuss the lysogenic and lytic cycles of HIV as it is a cirtical part on how the viral particles spread from one affected cell to a newly unaffected lymphocyte helper T cell.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Video
Audience Level: High School lower division (Grades 9-10), High School upper division (Grades 11-12), Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), General Public

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Scott Webster of University of New Hampshire at Manchester Dept. of Biology
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society


     
   

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