HomeAbout

SIGN IN   Advanced Search










 
Browse Biotechnology
Effects of US Maize Ethanol on Global Land Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Estimating Market-mediated Responses

Releases of greenhouse gases (GHG) from indirect land-use change triggered by crop-based biofuels have taken center stage in the debate over the role of biofuels in climate policy and energy security. This article analyzes these releases for maize ethanol produced in the United States. Factoring market-mediated responses and by-product use into our analysis reduces cropland conversion by 72% from the land used for the ethanol feedstock. Consequently, the associated GHG release estimated in our framework is 800 grams of carbon dioxide per megajoule (MJ); 27 grams per MJ per year, over 30 years of ethanol production, or roughly a quarter of the only other published estimate of releases attributable to changes in indirect land use. Nonetheless, 800 grams are enough to cancel out the benefits that corn ethanol has on global warming, thereby limiting its potential contribution in the context of California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard.

Rate this Resource:
1 = not useful, 5 = very useful

Please be the first to rate this resource.


Subscribe and
View Resource

Classifications


Resource Type: Journal article/Issue
Audience Level: Graduate, Professional (degree program), General public & informal education, Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Thomas Hertel of Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University
Publisher: American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS)
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes

Comments


» Sign In or register to post comments.


Collection:
American Institute for Biological Sciences


     
   

SITE MAP | CONTACT | POLICIES

Triple A S National Science Foundation Naitonal Science Digital Library Pathway
Funded by the individual BEN Collaborators and grants from the
National Science Foundation [DUE 0085840 / DUE 0226185 / DUE 0532797 / DUE 0734995]

This website is a National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Pathway.
Copyright © 2019. American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.