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Protein Structure Prediction and Structural Genomics

Genome sequencing projects are producing linear amino acid sequences, but full understanding of the biological role of these proteins will require knowledge of their structure and function. Although experimental structure determination methods are providing high-resolution structure information about a subset of the proteins, computational structure prediction methods will provide valuable information for the large fraction of sequences whose structures will not be determined experimentally. In this Viewpoint, we begin by describing the essential features of the methods, the accuracy of the models, and their application to the prediction and understanding of protein function, both for single proteins and on the scale of whole genomes. We then discuss the important role that protein structure prediction methods play in the growing worldwide effort in structural genomics.

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Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Diagram
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: David Baker of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Andrej Sali of Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, The Rockefeller University
Publisher: AAAS
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science


     
   

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