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Optical Switches for Remote and Noninvasive Control of Cell Signaling

This article discusses methods used for the study of cell signaling networks. Although the identity and interactions of signaling proteins have been studied in great detail, the complexity of signaling networks cannot be fully understood without elucidating the timing and location of activity of individual proteins. To do this, one needs a means for detecting and controlling specific signaling events. An attractive approach is to use light, both to report on and control signaling proteins in cells, because light can probe cells in real time with minimal damage. Although optical detection of signaling events has been successful for some time, the development of the means for optical control has accelerated only recently. Of particular interest is the development of chemically engineered proteins that are directly sensitive to light.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Illustration, Review
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Pau Gorostiza of Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats and Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya, Ehud Y. Isacoff of Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California at Berkeley
Publisher: SCIENCE
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science


     
   

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