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Crossing the Nuclear Envelope: Hierarchical Regulation of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport

This article discusses strategies for regulation of nuclear influx and efflux of proteins and RNAs. Transport of macromolecules between the nucleus and cytoplasm is a critical cellular process for eukaryotes, and the machinery that mediates nucleocytoplasmic exchange is subject to multiple levels of control. Regulation is achieved by modulating the expression or function of single cargoes, transport receptors, or the transport channel. Each of these mechanisms has increasingly broad impacts on transport patterns and capacity, and this hierarchy of control directly affects gene expression, signal transduction, development, and disease.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Illustration
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Laura Terry of Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Eric Shows of Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Susan Wente of Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Publisher: AAAS
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science


     
   

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