HomeAbout

SIGN IN   Advanced Search










 
Browse Biotechnology
Transduction of Receptor Signals by Ăź-Arrestins

This article discusses the discovery of β-arrestin–mediated signaling. The transmission of extracellular signals to the interior of the cell is a function of plasma membrane receptors, of which the seven transmembrane receptor family is by far the largest and most versatile. Classically, these receptors stimulate heterotrimeric G proteins, which control rates of generation of diffusible second messengers and entry of ions at the plasma membrane. Recent evidence, however, indicates another previously unappreciated strategy used by the receptors to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. They direct the recruitment, activation, and scaffolding of cytoplasmic signaling complexes via two multifunctional adaptor and transducer molecules, β-arrestins 1 and 2. This mechanism regulates aspects of cell motility, chemotaxis, apoptosis, and likely other cellular functions through a rapidly expanding list of signaling pathways.

Rate this Resource:
1 = not useful, 5 = very useful

Please be the first to rate this resource.


View Free
Resource

Classifications


Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Illustration, Table
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Robert Lefkowitz of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sudha Shenoy of Duke University Medical Center
Publisher: AAAS
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

Comments


» Sign In or register to post comments.


Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science


     
   

SITE MAP | CONTACT | POLICIES

Triple A S National Science Foundation Naitonal Science Digital Library Pathway
Funded by the individual BEN Collaborators and grants from the
National Science Foundation [DUE 0085840 / DUE 0226185 / DUE 0532797 / DUE 0734995]

This website is a National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Pathway.
Copyright © 2019. American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.