HomeAbout

SIGN IN   Advanced Search










 
Browse Biotechnology
Molecular Chaperones in the Cytosol: from Nascent Chain to Folded Protein

Efficient folding of many newly synthesized proteins depends on assistance from molecular chaperones, which serve to prevent protein misfolding and aggregation in the crowded environment of the cell. Nascent chain–binding chaperones, including trigger factor, Hsp70, and prefoldin, stabilize elongating chains on ribosomes in a nonaggregated state. Folding in the cytosol is achieved either on controlled chain release from these factors or after transfer of newly synthesized proteins to downstream chaperones, such as the chaperonins. These are large, cylindrical complexes that provide a central compartment for a single protein chain to fold unimpaired by aggregation. Understanding how the thousands of different proteins synthesized in a cell use this chaperone machinery has profound implications for biotechnology and medicine.

Rate this Resource:
1 = not useful, 5 = very useful

Please be the first to rate this resource.


View Free
Resource

Classifications


Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Illustration
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: F. Ulrich Hartl of Department of Cellular Biochemistry, Max-Planck-Institut fĂĽr Biochemie, Manajit Hayer-Hartl of Department of Cellular Biochemistry, Max-Planck-Institut fĂĽr Biochemie
Publisher: AAAS
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

Comments


» Sign In or register to post comments.


Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science


     
   

SITE MAP | CONTACT | POLICIES

Triple A S National Science Foundation Naitonal Science Digital Library Pathway
Funded by the individual BEN Collaborators and grants from the
National Science Foundation [DUE 0085840 / DUE 0226185 / DUE 0532797 / DUE 0734995]

This website is a National Science Digital Library (NSDL) Pathway.
Copyright © 2019. American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.