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Using a Microfluidic Device for High-Content Analysis of Cell Signaling

Quantitative analysis and understanding of signaling networks require measurements of the location and activities of key proteins over time, at the level of single cells, in response to various perturbations. Microfluidic devices enable such analyses to be conducted in a high-throughput and in a highly controlled manner. We describe in detail how to design and use a microfluidic device to perform such information-rich experiments.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Diagram, Illustration, Image, Laboratory manual
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Raymond Cheong of Department of Biomedical Engineering and Whitaker Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Chiaochun Joanne Wang of Department of Biomedical Engineering and Whitaker Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, Andre Levchenko of Department of Biomedical Engineering and Whitaker Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Cell Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling


     
   

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