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Signal Transduction Pathways as Targets for Therapeutics

Science's STKE sponsored a symposium at the AAAS Annual Meeting in February 2001. Five speakers addressed the signaling pathways that are modified in wide-ranging pathologies including inflammation, impotence, diabetes, obesity, and cancer. The molecular targets of signaling pathways included cell surface molecules, such as the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and receptor tyrosine kinases, and intracellular signaling components, such as phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and components of the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Ras signaling pathway. Analysis of the therapeutic strategies to impinge on these various pathways provides insight into both the potential of signaling pathways as relevant drug targets and the possible pitfalls that make complex signaling networks unpredictably difficult targets for such manipulation.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Diagram, Illustration, Image, Journal article/Issue, Report
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Nancy R. Gough of Science's STKE, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling


     
   

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