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Autophagy as a Regulated Pathway of Cellular Degradation

Macroautophagy is a dynamic process involving the rearrangement of subcellular membranes to sequester cytoplasm and organelles for delivery to the lysosome or vacuole where the sequestered cargo is degraded and recycled. This process takes place in all eukaryotic cells. It is highly regulated through the action of various kinases, phosphatases, and guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). The core protein machinery that is necessary to drive formation and consumption of intermediates in the macroautophagy pathway includes a ubiquitin-like protein conjugation system and a protein complex that directs membrane docking and fusion at the lysosome or vacuole. Macroautophagy plays an important role in developmental processes, human disease, and cellular response to nutrient deprivation.

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Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Diagram, Graph/chart
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Daniel Klionsky of Department of Biology, University of Michigan, Scott Emr of Division of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California
Publisher: AAAS
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

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