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Adapting Proteostasis for Disease Intervention

This article describes the proteostasis network, which is critical to maintenance of the health of the organism. The protein components of eukaryotic cells face acute and chronic challenges to their integrity. Eukaryotic protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, enables healthy cell and organismal development and aging and protects against disease. Here, we describe the proteostasis network, a set of interacting activities that maintain the health of proteome and the organism. Deficiencies in proteostasis lead to many metabolic, oncological, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular disorders. Small-molecule or biological proteostasis regulators that manipulate the concentration, conformation, quaternary structure, and/or the location of protein(s) have the potential to ameliorate some of the most challenging diseases of our era.

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Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Illustration
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: William E. Balch of Department of Cell Biology and the Institute for Childhood and Neglected Diseases, The Scripps Research Institute, Richard Morimoto of Department of Biochemistry, Rice Institute for Biomedical Research, Andrew Dillin of Molecular Biology, Northwestern University, Jeffery Kelly of and Cell Biology, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Publisher: AAAS
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No

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