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2005: Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year

2005 was particularly notable for the range and scope of exciting advances in cell signaling research. Nominations from leading scientists ranged from plant signaling, neurobiology, and immunology to systems biology and structural biology. In plant biology, a new piece added to a long-standing puzzle in auxin signaling was discovered. The exploitation and regulation of RNA in cell signaling was also in the limelight. Intriguing new twists were highlighted in relation to functional and dysfunctional signaling in the brain, calcium-mediated signals, and the innate immune response. Finally, mathematical and statistical analysis of biochemical networks provided new insights into the circuitry of cell signaling pathways.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Illustration, Image, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Botany & Plant Science, Cell biology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Elizabeth M. Adler of Science's STKE, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Nancy R. Gough of Science's STKE, American Association for the Advancement of Science, L. Bryan Ray of Science's STKE and Science, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2006-01-03
Date Added to BEN: 2008-04-23
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2006 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



2006: Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year

With nominations from leading scientists studying cell signaling, the STKE editors compile a list of the year's most important advances. Signaling breakthroughs included molecules and processes both outside cells and inside cells, from channels in the membrane to chromatin in the nucleus. The nominated research ranged from structural and functional revelations to approaches for the global analysis of signaling pathways. Receptors were highlighted with unexpected proteins functioning as receptors, as well as surprising functions for known receptors. This year also brought new insights into the impact of cell signaling on human physiology and disease.

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Resource Type: Diagram, Image, Journal article/Issue, Photograph, Review
Discipline: Biochemistry, Cell biology, Developmental Biology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Elizabeth M. Adler of American Association for the Advancement of Science, Nancy R. Gough of American Association for the Advancement of Science, L. Bryan Ray of American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2007-01-02
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2007 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



2007: Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year

This year's notable advances in cell signaling span research into the signals that regulate the state of chromatin in the cell nucleus to those signals that modulate the social behavior of organisms. This year’s findings include unexpected mechanisms and players in immune signaling pathways; new insights into the mechanisms underlying cell differentiation and development; lessons from model organisms regarding organismal behavior; revelations regarding the dynamics of cell signaling pathways; increasing recognition of the ubiquity and complexity of ubiquitin and related molecules in signaling processes; and a family of channels that have cornered the market on peripheral sensory perception.

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Resource Type: Diagram, Illustration, Image, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Behavioral Science, Cell biology, Immunology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Elizabeth M. Adler of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science, John F. Foley of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Nancy R. Gough of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science, L. Bryan Ray of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2008-01-08
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



2008 Visualization Challenge Winners

The winners -- in categories including photography, illustration, informational graphics, and multimedia -- captured the crystalline beauty of diatoms, the expanse of the human circulatory system, a fairy tale tea party re-invented, and the dynamic life of a plant cell.

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Resource Type: Animation, Diagram, Video
Discipline: Biochemistry, Botany & Plant Science, Cell biology, Human Biology, Immunology, Marine Biology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Middle school 6-8, High school lower division 9-10, High school upper division 11-12, Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Racheal Zelkowitz of AAAS
Publisher: AAAS
Date Published: 2009-12-01, 2008-10-05
Date Added to BEN: 2010-01-28
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: © 2008 American Association for the Advancement of Science. All Rights Reserved.

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Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science



2009: Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year

Nominations for this year's signaling breakthroughs spanned physiology, therapeutics and drug development, neuroscience, and plant signaling. Among the most exciting advances in mammalian biology were therapeutic applications of research that are overturning the conventional boundaries of signaling pathways, unexpected mechanisms to prolong life and prevent aging, new insights into schizophrenia and memory, development of a transgenic primate model, and the discovery that the cells in the lungs can “taste” noxious substances. In plant signaling, the nominations converged on the identification of the elusive receptor for the plant stress hormone abscisic acid. Finally, methodological advances were also noted with new techniques in synthetic biology enabling the precise spatiotemporal control of signaling events and increasingly facile methods for creation and analysis of proteomic data yielding tremendous increases in raw data and insights into cellular regulation.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Diagram, Illustration, Image, Journal article/Issue, Photograph, Review
Discipline: Biochemistry, Bioinformatics Genomics & Proteomics, Biotechnology, Botany & Plant Science, Cell biology, Developmental Biology, Evolutionary Biology, Human Biology, Immunology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology, Pharmacology, Proteomics, Vertebrate Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), General public & Informal Education, Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Elizabeth M. Adler of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2010-01-05
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2010 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



2010: Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year

Members of the Editorial Board nominated as signaling breakthroughs insights gained from the “mega”—large-scale systems analyses—and the “micro”—protein structures—along with new findings in metabolism and genetics. In addition, research studies that may lead to new therapeutic avenues for cancer, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease were selected as breakthroughs, along with the identification of unexpected heterogeneity of innate immune cells.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Diagram, Illustration, Image, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Biochemistry, Bioinformatics Genomics & Proteomics, Cell biology, Developmental Biology, Genetics & Heredity, Genomics, Hematology, Human Biology, Immunology, Metabolism, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology, Proteomics, Structural biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Elizabeth M. Adler of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2011-01-04
Date Added to BEN: 2011-01-19
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2011 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



2011: Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year

The editors of Science Signaling are pleased to start 2012 with our 10th compilation of the most exciting cell signaling research to emerge in the previous year. The Signaling Breakthroughs list is selected from articles nominated by members of the Science Signaling Editorial Board as providing major advances in cell signaling, particularly those that were unexpected or likely to open up new avenues of research. This edition includes breakthroughs in the structural analysis of signaling proteins, technological advances in imaging, and insights into the mechanisms controlling gene expression, immune function, and the cellular response to stress.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Diagram, Illustration, Image, Journal article/Issue
Discipline: Biochemistry, Cell biology, Developmental Biology, Human Biology, Immunology, Metabolism, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology, Pharmacology, Toxicology, Vertebrate Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Elizabeth M. Adler of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2012-01-03
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2012 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



2012: Signaling Breakthroughs of the Year

With input from the members of the Board of Reviewing Editors and editorial staff, Science Signaling puts the spotlight on the hottest signaling research of 2012. The connection between signaling and metabolism continues to be an important area. Signaling breakthroughs in cancer, immunology, developmental biology, neuroscience, and microbiology all made the list. Structural and molecular insights into signaling proteins and networks are also beginning to not only yield potential therapeutic targets but also lead to successful efforts between synthetic biologists and clinicians in the treatment of cancer.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Diagram, Journal article/Issue
Discipline: Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Cell biology, Developmental Biology, Endocrinology, Human Biology, Immunology, Metabolism, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology, Pathology, Structural biology, Vertebrate Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Michael B. Yaffe of Chief Scientific Editor of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Nancy R. Gough of Editor of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2013-01-01
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-12
Format: application/pdf, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright 2013 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



A Brand New START: Abscisic Acid Perception and Transduction in the Guard Cell

The combined daily consumption of fresh water ranges from 200 to 700 liters per capita per day in most developed countries, with ~70% used for agricultural needs. With the looming prospect of global water crisis, the success in deciphering the early steps in the signal transduction of the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has ignited hopes that crops can be engineered with the capacity to maintain productivity while requiring less water input. ABA can accumulate 10- to 30-fold in plants under drought stress relative to unstressed conditions. The hormone triggers diverse adaptive pathways, permitting plants to withstand temporary bouts of water shortage. One experimental model to unravel the details of ABA signaling mechanisms is based on the hormone’s ability to elicit stomatal closure—a rapid cellular response used by plants to limit water loss through transpiration. Each stoma, or pore, is contoured by two specialized kidney-shaped cells called guard cells. The stomatal pores are the primary portals for photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake and, by triggering closure of these pores, drought negatively affects photosynthesis and, consequently, biomass. The stomatal aperture widens and narrows by expansion and contraction, respectively, of these flanking guard cells caused by changes in the intracellular concentrations of ions and organic solutes. These events require coordination of ion channels, which generate a specific pattern of electrical signals that relay the ABA stimulus. A soluble ABA receptor that turns on and off the activities of a kinase and phosphatase pair is at the heart of the signaling complex. Results distilled from the latest structural studies on these ABA receptors, characterized by the so-called START domain, are beginning to tender exciting promise for rational design of agonists and antagonists for modulating stress adaptive ability in plants. With 4 figures, 2 tables, and 127 citations, this Review charts the extraordinary progress on understanding how ABA controls membrane transport mechanisms that evoke the stomatal closing pathway. More background details are available with the teaching tools at www.plantcell.org.gate1.inist.fr/site/teachingtools/teaching.xhtml.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Botany & Plant Science, Cell biology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Archana Joshi-Saha of Institut des Sciences du Vegetal, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Christiane Valon of Institut des Sciences du Vegetal, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Jeffrey Leung of Institut des Sciences du Vegetal, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2011-11-29
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2011 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



A Call to Arms: The Cytokine Selection Service

The process by which nai¨ve T helper (TH) cells differentiate into the TH1 and TH2 subtypes has been well studied. However, there remain some unresolved issues pertaining to the requirements for the initial step of TH cell differentiation. Much debate exists about whether the roles of cytokines include the forcing of the initial steps of differentiation on nai¨ve TH cells, termed "instruction," or whether cytokines act in a supportive role, termed "selection," whereby newly differentiating TH cells are given the proper signals for survival and proliferation. A recent paper by Mullen et al., which helps delineate the role of cytokines in TH1 cell development, is addressed by Nelson; it appears that cytokines act in the selection stage of TH cell maturation.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Diagram, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Cell biology, Immunology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: John W. Nelson of Science's Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment, American Association for the Advancement of Science
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2001-07-17
Date Added to BEN: 2004-09-02
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright American Association for the Advancement of Science

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



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