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A Cytoskeletal Platform for Local Translation in Axons

Recent data indicate that local translation in growth cones is critical for axon guidance. Evidence from the Drosophila midline axon guidance system suggests that the F-actin-microtubule cross-linker Short stop (Shot) might link the translation machinery to the cytoskeleton in the growth cone. The identification of a complex of translation factors attached to the actin and microtubule networks points to a mechanism by which cytoskeletal dynamics regulate translation in axons and vice versa.

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Resource Type: Diagram, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review, Bibliography
Discipline: Cell biology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Francisca P. G. Van Horck of University of Cambridge, Christine E. Holt of University of Cambridge
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2008-02-26
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



A dam in the middle of a river

Dams have negative impacts on the plants and animals that have adapted to the specific movement of natural rivers and streams. Dams also cause temperature changes, erosion, and movement of sediment that are deadly to many organisms.

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Resource Type: Image
Discipline: Ecology
Pedagogical Use: Teach
Audience Level: Middle school 6-8

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Katie Hale of Student, California State University
Publisher: Byron Lane, State of Michigan
Date Published: 2007-01-12
Date Added to BEN: 2007-11-12
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: no description

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Collection:
Video and Image Data Access



A Discrete Signaling Function for an Inositol Pyrophosphate

Inositol pyrophosphates were, until recently, without clearly defined functions. Two recent papers in Science have now clearly defined a function for an IP7 pyrophosphate (inositol hexaphosphate with one pyrophosphate) that is the product of the enzyme encoded by the Vip1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This IP7 with a pyrophosphate tentatively assigned to be on either the 4 or 6 position is a cofactor that is required for inactivating the cyclin–cyclin-dependent kinase complex of Pho80, Pho81, and Pho85. Inhibition of the kinase results in the nuclear translocation of Pho4, which is a transcription factor that promotes expression of genes required for phosphate assimilation under conditions of low phosphate. When grown in low-phosphate media, IP7 accumulates, which leads to the expression of genes involved in the acquisition of phosphate.

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Resource Type: Bibliography, Diagram, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Cell biology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Philip W. Majerus of Division of Hematology, Washington University School of Medicine
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2007-12-11
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2008 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



A Dominant Role of Cardiac Molecular Motors in the Intrinsic Regulation of Ventricular Ejection and Relaxation - Figure 1

This figure is a schematic illustrating the state of cross bridges in the cycle from rest to active states.

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Resource Type: Digital Presentation (Powerpoint), Illustration, Image, Journal Article/Issue
Discipline: Cardiology, Physiology
Pedagogical Use: learn
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), Graduate, Professional (degree program), General Public, Informal Education, Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: PhD R. John Solaro of University of Illinois at Chicago Dept. of Physiology & Biophys (M/C 901)
Date Published: 2007-04-01
Date Added to BEN: 2011-01-18
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society



A Dominant Role of Cardiac Molecular Motors in the Intrinsic Regulation of Ventricular Ejection and Relaxation - Figure 2

This figure describes the relation between Ca2+ bound to cardiac thin filaments (Ca2+-Tn-Tm-Actin) and left ventricular pressure (LVP) in a beat of the heart.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Digital Presentation (Powerpoint), Illustration, Image, Journal Article/Issue
Discipline: Cardiology, Physiology
Pedagogical Use: learn
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16), Graduate, Professional (degree program), General Public, Informal Education, Continuing Education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: PhD R. John Solaro of University of Illinois at Chicago Dept. of Physiology & Biophys (M/C 901)
Date Published: 2007-04-01
Date Added to BEN: 2011-01-18
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Physiological Society



A fern plant in forest habitat

Ferns and horsetails are well-known seedless vascular plants. Different from mosses, ferns have branched spore producing structures which allows for the plant to produce many spores. The spots on the leaves of the fern contain the spores.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Image
Discipline: Biodiversity, Botany & Plant Science
Pedagogical Use: Learn
Audience Level: Middle school 6-8

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Katie Hale of Student, California State University
Publisher: Nancy Pelaez, CSUF
Date Published: 2007-01-13
Date Added to BEN: 2007-11-12
Format: image/jpeg
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: no description

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Collection:
Video and Image Data Access



A Field Study of Interspecific Relationships

This exercise can be used to study population ecology, food webs and trophic levels. It is meant to give students a better understanding of the interrelatedness of organisms in a community by studying several common local relationships.

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User Rating: 3 / 5 stars - 1 vote(s).


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Classifications


Resource Type: Image
Discipline: Ecology, Natural History, Population Biology
Pedagogical Use: Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Henry Mann of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, Lois Bateman of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, Alan E. Burger of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, Marie H. Iams of Sir Wilfred Grenfell College
Publisher: ABLE
Date Published: 1984-06-11
Date Added to BEN: 2007-06-11
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science



A Flower of Tibouchina semidecandra,

A flower of Tibouchina semidecandra, a well-known ornamental from southeastern Brazil. Tibouchinais a member of the large tropical family Melastomataceae and together with other Melastomeae has been regarded as representing a relatively basal element of the family. Molecular evidence suggests that Tibouchina, Melastoma, Osbeckia, and other Melastomeae represent a derived clade of Melastomataceae that only recently reached Africa and tropical Asia.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Image
Discipline: Botany & Plant Science
Audience Level: High school lower division 9-10, High school upper division 11-12, Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Karl Niklas of Department of Biology, Cornell University, Susanne Renner of University of Missouri-St. Louis
Date Published: 2004-03-09
Date Added to BEN: 2004-03-08
Format: image/jpeg
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: Use of the site is limited to free use in a nonprofit educational or private non-commercial context. Images remain the property of the copyright holder, who retains all rights implicit in copyright laws and other rights to the images not enumerated here for worldwide use. Images may be stored for personal or classroom use, provided that the image displays the unaltered text watermark. All rights to reproduce these images are retained by the Botanical Society of America and the copyright owner. By accessing these images, you are consenting to our licensing agreement. By mentioning these rights, we are just underscoring that those who donated these images should get credit for them and receive any nominal fees should a publisher decide to use these images in a book or CD.

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Collection:
Botanical Society of America



A giant panda

The giant panda is endangered because of habitat loss and low birth rates in the wild and captivity. In the past, poaching also lowered the numbers of surviving pandas and they became listed as an endangered species.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Image
Discipline: Ecology, Wildlife science, Zoology
Pedagogical Use: Teach
Audience Level: Primary elementary K-2, Intermediate elementary 3-5

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Aaron Siirila of None
Publisher: None
Date Published: 2007-03-16
Date Added to BEN: 2008-07-18
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: no description

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Collection:
Video and Image Data Access



A Gluconeogenic Tryst in the Nucleus, with ER Stress as the Third Wheel

The transcriptional output of a cell reflects the sum of cooperative and competing interactions among hundreds of transcriptional regulators that are themselves regulated according to cellular conditions. In this way, disparate signaling cascades intersect at the level of gene expression; perturbation in one area of the cell will necessarily and fundamentally affect other areas as the cell strives to integrate information from multiple pathways. The consequences of such transcriptional cross-talk are highlighted by a newly discovered connection, through a common co-regulator, between stress in the endoplasmic reticulum and control of gluconeogenesis. These findings hint at the possible functions of stress pathways as regulators of basal cellular homeostasis.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Bibliography, Diagram, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Biochemistry, Cell biology, Metabolism, Molecular Biology, Physiology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: D. Thomas Rutkowski of Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2009-11-10
Date Added to BEN: 2013-05-11
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2010 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



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