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Displaying results 61 - 70 of 7340 matches found.

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A Matter of Life and Cell Death

In multicellular organisms, mutations in somatic cells affecting critical genes that regulate cell proliferation and survival cause fatal cancers. Repair of the damage is one obvious option, although the relative inconsequence of individual cells in metazoans means that it is often a ÔÇťsaferÔÇŁ strategy to ablate the offending cell. Not surprisingly, corruption of the machinery that senses or implements DNA damage greatly predisposes to cancer. Nonetheless, even when oncogenic mutations do occur, there exist potent mechanisms that limit the expansion of affected cells by suppressing their proliferation or triggering their suicide. Growing understanding of these innate mechanisms is suggesting novel therapeutic strategies for cancer.

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Resource Type: Journal article/Issue, Review, Illustration
Discipline: Biochemistry, Bioinformatics Genomics & Proteomics, Biotechnology, Cell biology, Developmental Biology, Molecular Biology, Pathology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Plan, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program), Continuing education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Gerard Evan of Imperial Cancer Research Fund Laboratories
Publisher: AAAS
Date Published: 2011-09-30, 1998-08-28
Date Added to BEN: 2013-01-28
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: Access to the article is free; however registration and sign-in are required. © Copyright AAAS. All rights reserved.

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Collection:
American Association for the Advancement of Science



A Mechanism of Asymmetrical Cell Division

Two PowerPoint slides showing a generalized model of asymmetrical cell division and some of the molecular details of the mechanism in C. elegans (a round worm). Multicellular organisms use this mechanism to generate daughter cells that can undergo differential development and create organismal complexity. Text explaining the diagrams is appended, as is the citation to a Nature Cell Biology Review article on this topic.

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Resource Type: Diagram, Digital Presentation (Powerpoint)
Discipline: Cell biology, Developmental Biology
Pedagogical Use: teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: James Cooley of U of Arizona CMM
Publisher: U of Arizona
Date Published: 2011-11-13
Date Added to BEN: 2013-01-27
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Society for Developmental Biology



A Method for Teaching the Osteology of Irregular Bones

An article from HAPSEducator describing aa approach towards teaching students how to "circumnavigate" the irregular bones (ossa coxae, scapulae, vertebrae) using anatomical and geographical terminology.

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Resource Type: Image, Map, Laboratory or Hands-On Activity, Teaching Strategies & Guidelines, Journal Article/Issue
Discipline: Anatomy, Physiology
Pedagogical Use: learn
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division (Grades 13-14), Undergraduate upper division (Grades 15-16)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Mary Lou Bareither of University of Illinois - Chicago
Date Published: 2006-01-01
Date Added to BEN: 2013-01-27
Copyright and other restrictions: No
Cost: No

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Collection:
Human Anatomy and Physiology Society



A mitochondrial DNA sequence, 2D animation
Site: DNA Interactive (www.dnai.org)


The DNA found in mitochondria ┬ë?├ĺ the energy-producing organelles of cells ┬ë?├ĺ is often analyzed to trace evolutionary pathways. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has a high "substitution" or mutation rate, compared with other sites in our genome. mtDNA is transmitted only from mother to child, and can be inherited intact over thousands of generations. Mutations in the mtDNA sequence can be used to reconstruct the maternal lineage of populations.

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Resource Type: animation
Discipline: genetics & health, neurobiology, population biology, psychology, reproductive biology, sociobiology, public health
Audience Level: General public & informal education

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: David Micklos of DNA Learning Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Jan Witkowski of Banbury Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Garland Allen of Biology Department, Washington University at St. Louis, Elof Carlson of Biology Department, SUNY at Stony Brook, Paul Lombardo of Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Virginia, Steven Selden of Education Policy and Leadership Department, University of Maryland
Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Date Published: 2008-10-06
Date Added to BEN: 2008-10-17
Format: application/x-shockwave-flash
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: Copyright © 1999-2008: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; All rights reserved.

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Collection:
Dolan DNA Learning Center



A Model for Fast-Track Exocytosis of Synaptic Vesicles

The animation illustrates one model for "kiss-and-run" or fast-track release of neurotransmitter through a calcium-triggered transient pore formed between the synaptic vesicle and plasma membrane. The vesicles remain attached to the plasma membrane throughout the cycle. The animation illustrates a role for SNARE proteins and dynamin in the formation and closure of the pore. The animation would be useful in both neurobiology courses, but also any cell biology course that explores calcium-regulated secretion events.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Animation
Discipline: Biocomplexity, Cell biology, Neurobiology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Thierry Galli of Membrane Traffic and Neuronal Plasticity Group, Institut du Fer-a-moulin, Volker Haucke of Institut fur Chemie-Biochemie, Freie Universitat Berlin
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2005-01-18
Date Added to BEN: 2005-02-18
Format: application/x-shockwave-flash, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: Copyright © 2005 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



A Model for Local Regulation of Translation Near Active Synapses

Synaptic plasticity results in enduring changes in synaptic function. Localized protein synthesis is part of this process. This animation shows how a dynamic macromolecular structure, the RNA granule, may allow localized translation of proteins at the site of active synapses and thereby serve as a key element contributing to changes in protein production leading to synaptic plasticity. This animation would be useful in teaching a neurobiology or neuroscience course, where it could be used to illustrate mechanisms for activity-dependent protein translation, or in a biochemistry course or a molecular or cellular biology course, where it could be used to illustrate mechanisms governing regulation of protein translation.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Animation
Discipline: Cell biology, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Kenneth S. Kosik of Department of Molecular, University of California, Anna M. Krichevsky of Cellular, Harvard Medical School
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2005-09-06
Date Added to BEN: 2006-10-17
Format: text/html, video/quicktime
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: Copyright © 2005 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



A Moving New Role for the Sodium Pump in Epithelial Cells and Carcinomas

The Na,K-ATPase, or sodium pump, is a ubiquitous plasma membrane protein in higher eukaryotes, including humans, that carries out the coupled active transport of Na+ ions out of the cell and of K+ ions into the cell, using the energy of hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate. In recent years, it has been suggested that that this protein may also be involved in various other functions, such as transducing information from the extracellular milieu to intracellular signaling pathways, much like a growth factor receptor. It has also been suggested that the sodium pump may be essential to the formation and function of junctional complexes in epithelial cells, and, most recently, it has been shown to play a role in epithelial cell motility. Maloney sarcoma virus–transformed Madin Darby canine kidney cells have depressed Na,K-ATPase β subunit abundance and enhanced motility as compared with untransformed cells. Repletion of Na,K-ATPase β subunits in the transformed cells results in suppression of motility. The most recent work, discussed here, demonstrates that the Na,K-ATPase α and β subunits play distinct and separate roles, interacting with proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and leading to the remodeling of the cytoskeleton and lamellipodia formation. The sodium pump subunits thus seem to play a role in regulating carcinoma cell motility and may be involved in cell motility suppression in many epithelial cells.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Diagram, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review
Discipline: Biochemistry, Cell biology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Jack H. Kaplan of Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Illinois at Chicago
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2005-06-21
Date Added to BEN: 2005-10-25
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright © 2005 by the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



A Naturally Occurring Biofilm from a Septic System

Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the naturally occurring biofilm on sand grains in the clog mat of a septic system infiltration mound.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Visual, Image
Discipline: Microbiology
Pedagogical Use: Learn
Audience Level: Undergraduate lower division 13-14, Undergraduate upper division 15-16

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: American Society For Microbiology
Publisher: American Society For Microbiology
Date Published: 2002-01-01
Date Added to BEN: 2011-03-17
Format: text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: No
Cost Description: The American Society for Microbiology grants the public the nonexclusive rights to copy, distribute, or display MicrobeLibrary Resources (ML) under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. For more information visit, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/

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Collection:
American Society for Microbiology v2.0



A New Dynamic 3D Virtual Methodology for Teaching the Mechanics of Atrial Septation as Seen in the Human Heart

This article describes an advancement in student learning for teaching the mechanics of atrial septation as seen in the human heart. The authors have created a 3D virtual guide to the process of normal atrial septation to understand the temporal and spatial aspects, which has long been difficult for students to link.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Animation, Journal Article/Issue
Discipline: Anatomy, Cardiology, Education, Embryology
Pedagogical Use: teach
Audience Level: Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Claude Almange of H├┤pital de Pontchaillou D├ępartement de Cardiologie et Maladies Vasculaires, Jean-Louis Dillenseger of Universit├ę de Rennes INSERM, Jean-Marc Schleich of H├┤pital de Pontchaillou D├ępartement de Cardiologie et Maladies Vasculaires
Date Published: 2009-04-03
Date Added to BEN: 2012-03-18
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes

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Collection:
American Association of Anatomists



A New Gun in Town: The U Box Is a Ubiquitin Ligase Domain

Ubiquitin ligases determine protein stability in a highly regulated manner by coordinating the addition of polyubiquitin chains to proteins that are then targeted to the proteasome for degradation. Ubiquitin ligases have generally been separated into two groups--those containing HECT domains and those with RING finger domains. Recently, a third group of ubiquitin ligases has emerged: those containing a U-box domain. Patterson discusses what is known about the few U-box-containing proteins that have been characterized, although the general properties of U-box proteins that distinguish them from other ubiquitin ligases are still a matter of speculation.

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Classifications


Resource Type: Diagram, Illustration, Journal article/Issue, Review, Table
Discipline: Biochemistry, Cell biology, Molecular Biology
Pedagogical Use: Learn, Research, Teach
Audience Level: Undergraduate upper division 15-16, Graduate, Professional (degree program)

Author and Copyright


Authors and Editors: Cam Patterson of Carolina Cardiovascular Biology Center and Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Date Published: 2002-01-22
Date Added to BEN: 2004-05-17
Format: application/pdf, image/gif, image/jpeg, text/html
Copyright and other restrictions: Yes
Cost: Yes
Cost Description: Copyright 2002 American Association for the Advancement of Science

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Collection:
STKE/Science Signaling



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